Garden Guide: The Amateur Gardener's Handbook
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190
GARDEN GUIDE
Name
How to Prune
When
EXOCHORDA GRANDIFLORA
(See Pearl Bush)
FLOWERING CURRANT
(Ribes aureum)
FLOWERING PLUM
FORSYTHIAS
FRINGE TREE
(See Chionanthus)
GOLDEN BELL
(See Forsythia)
GOLDEN CHAIN
(See Laburnum)
GOOSEBERRIES
GRAPES
(See illttstration on
page 141.)
HIBISCUS SYRIACUS
(See Rose of Sharon)
HONEYSUCKLES
HONEYSUCKLE
LONICERA FRAGRANTISSIMA
LONICERA STANDISHII
HYDRANGEA
HYDRANGEA PANICULATA
Cut back just after flowering.
Encourage vigorous young growth,
out older wood.
Trim
Thin put branches and trim back others im-
mediately after flowering.
Remove oldest shoots annually. In July or
Aug. cut back each a bit; it causes more
fruit buds to form.
Persons who have inherited tangles of Grape
vines should exercise care in pruning the
first year. Do not remove too much at the
start, otherwise no Grapes will be pro-
duced. When possible, all untrained vines
should be pruned back to a single eye if the
vines are very large, but two eyes may be
left if the vines are quite small. When the
Grapes have nicely set we seem to think
that they are benefited by cutting off the
tips of each bearing cane two leaves away
from each bunch. The canes usually branch
in this case, and they may be cut back a
little even then. Should one acquire or
have to buy new vines, it is well to have a
definite simple system of training. Grapes
at planting and the year after should have
the vines cut back two to three eyes. Then
head back to 20 to 24 in. long. Several sys-
tems of training are good.
Kieffen System. Good if wind is not too[
strong; simple. Single trunk is carried to
the upper of two wires and two canes are
taken out at an eye for each wire. Each
year all the canes are removed except a
shoot from each; spurs are chosen from the
trunk. A vine may carry 40 buds usually.
The fruit canes are produced on shoots of
previous year ' s growth.
Chautauqua System. Two short, permanent
branches are established at the lower
wire; two or three canes are left on each
arm and tied up to upper wire;
these canes are renewed each year
from buds at their base. When arms get
too old, new ones are easily established.
The climbers and the bush Honeysuckles,
except Spring flowering Standishii and
fragrantissima.
Hydrangeas bloom upon wood produced the
current season from older wood. They
must, therefore, not be cut down wholly to
the ground, otherwise they bloom poorly.
These shrubs should be large because they
are old; they should not be allowed to get
into a monstrous size when young; their
beauty is entirely spoiled by such treat-
ment. If one does not admire the flower
stalks, they are best pruned in Nov.
July
July
Late Summer
Jan.-Mar
Jan.-Mar.
July
Jan.-Mar.
Jan.-Mar.
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