The life and works of William Cullen Bryant
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JOYS AND DOUBTS. H 3
& quot; Dear are these heights, though bleak their sides they raise,
For here, as forth in lonely walk we fare ;
Her cheek to mine soft Evelina lays,
And breathes those gentle vows that none may share.
Mine is her earliest flame her virgin care
The look of love her speaking eye that fills
To the known shade, when Eve s consenting star
Sees his soft image in the trembling rills,
My lovely Oread comes my charmer of the hills. & quot;
CUMMINGTON, 1814.
With Bion, he tells his solemn joy to the skies :
& quot; Hail, holy star of love, thou fairest gem
Of all that twinkle in the veil of night !
As the & quot;broad moon to thee, so thou to them
Superior in beau|y beamest bright.
Lend me, while she delays, thy tender light.
Thou for whom Sol, to yield his turn to thine
Stooped to the glowing West his hastened flight ;
On deeds of guilt I call thee not to shine,
Nor thefts, but those of love and mutual love is mine. & quot;
WORTHINGTON, 1814.
But again doubts and misgivings intrude in the midst of it
all ; and something apparently has gone wrong :
& quot; Ah, who would tempt the hopeless spell,
Whose magic binds the slaves of Love ?
The heart his power has touched can tell
How false to peace his flatteries prove.
& quot; Each silent sign by passion taught
To tell the wish that thrills the breast,
The gaze with speechless meaning fraught,
The glowing lip in secret pressed.
& quot; The stolen hour by moonlight past,
When hands are met and sighs are deep ;
Are wanderings all, for which at last
The heart must bleed, the eye must weep. & quot;
VOL. I. 9
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